Hook up propane heater

Hook up propane heater

Please make sure that you are posting in the form of a question. The Mr. Quick, quiet convection heat! Convenient, easy and safe! Not to mention economical and efficient. It's just the ticket when you need to kill the chill in your ice house, cabin, enclosed porch or that drafty room in your house.

Mr Heater 30,000 BTU Vent-free Blue Flame Propane Heater

Installing a vent-free propane heater is one of the best upgrades you can do for your RV if you plan to be spending a lot of time in chilly places. This page reviews how ventless propane heaters operate in comparison to traditional RV furnaces, it discusses the different technologies used in the design of various types of vent-free gas heaters on the market today — including catalytic heaters, ceramic brick and plaque heaters, and blue flame heaters — and it presents a step-by-step guide for installing a vent-free propane heater in your RV or camper.

This post was first written in January, , but was completely overhauled and rewritten in October, Happiness is… a vent-free propane heater! We froze in our trailer during our first winter in Arizona. All modern motorhomes and campers ours included come equipped with a propane furnace. However, these loud, inefficient beasts use a lot of electricity, and can drain the batteries in one night.

These are wonderful little appliances that use far less propane than a furnace and no electricity at all. All summer long we thought about the project, but never found ourselves in a town where there was a good selection of heaters to look at or anyone knowledgeable about installing them in RVs. So we dawdled. Bob has installed quite a few of these little devils over the years, and he gave us some hints and loaned us two critical tools for the project: We learned a lot through this process, and I thought it might be helpful, along with our other RV tips and tricks pages to include some notes here about our project.

There are several types of vent-free heaters on the market, and each has its pros and cons. In the end, we opted to buy a 20, BTU thermostatically controlled blue flame heater made by Vanguard. The night before the installation we laughed as we bundled ourselves into our recliners wearing multiple layers, buried under blankets for the last time. The night after the installation, in shorts and t-shirt, I had to poke my nose out the window to get some cool air.

In our excitement, we had inadvertently heated the bedroom to 85 degrees. We have used and loved this heater year-round ever since, running it near sea-level in the southern states in the winter months and using in the cool mountains during the summer months! Propane uses oxygen as it burns and gives off moisture as a by-product. Therefore it has the potential to use up all the oxygen in an enclosed space and kill any living, breathing occupants while creating a layer of condensation on the insides of windows.

To accommodate these unpleasant aspects of propane heating, conventional RV propane furnaces use a large blower system to bring in outside, oxygen-rich air. In turn, they vent the moist, oxygen-depleted air from inside the rig to the outside. Circulating the air this way keeps the oxygen level in the air fairly constant and significantly reduces the build-up of condensation on the insides of the windows, as the moisture gets blown outside along with the exhausted air.

However, by blowing all this warm air outside, the furnace is effectively heating the outdoors. If you stand outside an RV next to the furnace vent on a really cold day, you can warm your hands and body quite nicely. Also, this blower requires electricity to run. RV furnaces are DC, so they do not require an inverter or generator in order to operate. If you are boondocking , or dry camping in the desert as many winter Snowbird RVers do, you are then faced with a choice of either keeping the RV unacceptably cold, or using a generator to keep the batteries charged even our big solar power installation on the Hitchhiker 5th wheel was not enough to keep up with the furnace blower during the winter.

Besides heating the outside air and running the batteries down, a major disadvantage of a standard RV propane furnaces is that the blower is really loud. There is nothing like being deeply absorbed in a really great movie and listening to some very profound dialog being exchanged in whispers, and having the furnace suddenly roar to life and drown out everything being said. Our furnace blower often woke us up out of a sound sleep too.

In contrast, vent-free propane heaters are silent and provide heat without using any battery power. This is because they rely on you to give them fresh air: All US-made vent-free heaters are built with an internal oxygen sensor that shuts off the heater if the oxygen level in the room becomes too depleted. You may also need or choose to run a small fan to circulate the air. This will use some battery power, but you can decide how much or how little to use the fan. Brrr… This was what life was like before we installed our vent-free propane heater!

So, in essence, when using a vent-free heater, you must find a happy balance between several variables. Determine which kind of heater will best suit your needs see descriptions below , figure out where to place it in the RV, which window s to crack open, and how often to run a fan if at all , and if so, which kind of fan to use a little DC fan, like one used in a computer, a large AC ceiling fan that will require an inverter or generator to run, or an optional blower fan that can be purchased with the heater.

Heat rises, so in 5th wheel campers the heat tends to gather in the bedroom. Simply close the door to the bedroom, or crack it slightly open to control the movement of the warm air into that space. Likewise, if you use a ceiling fan, you can experiment with running it forward or backward, either to draw air up and move it out along the ceiling or to push the warm air down towards the floor.

Propane has a fixed capacity for providing heat. One gallon of propane contains 92, BTUs of potential heat, which means a 40, BTU RV furnace running full blast will burn through nearly a gallon of propane every two hours or so. During the coldest periods, it is a real pain in the neck to keep having to refill the propane tanks as you fly through propane trying to heat your rig.

These were sized appropriately for the square footage of each camper. However, we have found we can easily heat our big fifth wheel to higher temperatures in less time using our 20, BTU vent-free propane heater instead of the factory-installed 40k BTU RV furnace. So, a smaller vent-free heater that burns less propane per hour can effectively heat a given space more quickly than a traditional RV furnace that is twice its size.

Cold as that sounds, this uses up almost a gallon of propane a day and we can barely keep the batteries topped off using our watts of solar panels alone. Worst of all, living like this is really uncomfortable. Using our vent-free blue flame heater in the same conditions and burning the same one gallon of propane per day in those conditions, we can easily keep the 5th wheel at 76 degrees all day long. And we use almost no electricity. When choosing a vent-free propane heater, there are a lot of products on the market.

Catalytic and ceramic heaters produce infrared radiant heat which heats objects situated nearby much the same way the sun does. They create a warm, baking sensation on your skin, but if you move away like moving into the shade outdoors , that sensation goes away. The air in the room warms up over time as the objects in the room warm up.

In contrast, blue flame heaters heat the air, rather than the objects in the room, providing a more even, uniform warmth. Gradually, the objects in the room heat up as the overall temperature of the air in the room rises. All of these heaters come in different sizes, ranging from 5, to 30, BTUs, which are good for heating square feet up to 1, square feet. Small ones can be hung on the wall, out of the way, while big ones that appear modest-sized in the show room suddenly become monster heat sources that dominate the floor space when you get them home to your RV.

Catalytic heaters were the original vent-free heaters. The major brand is the Olympian Wave , manufactured by Camco, and their primary models are the Wave-3 , Wave-6 and Wave-8 heaters. These provide 3,, 6, and 8, BTUs of heat respectively. Catalytic heaters provide infrared radiant heat by way of a large pad on the surface of the heater. A chemical reaction in the pad causes heat to radiate off the entire pad. If you stand in front of a catalytic heater, your skin will feel a nice baking warmth on it.

The closer you sit, the more you will bake. This is a great feeling when you are chilled. These heaters have been in use for years, and have an enthusiastic following. A friend of ours tried to clean his by vacuuming it, and inadvertently ended up destroying the pad. Because the pads had changed slightly since he bought his unit five years earlier, he could not replace the pad and had to replace the entire heater instead.

You will need a brass elbow fitting from Camco for the installation. You may also want leg stands so the heater can stand on its own two feet and a dust cover to protect the catalytic pads when it is not in use. Ceramic infrared heaters are a slightly newer technology that has been warming RVs for quite a few years. The most popular brand on the market is Mr. Ceramic heaters provide the same infrared radiant heat as catalytic heaters.

Like a catalytic heater, standing in front of a brick or plaque ceramic heater will toast your toes to your thighs on the front of your legs. The heat from the bricks interacts with your skin and you will feel a wonderful tingly warmth. Most can be purchased with or without a thermostat. One big disadvantage is that the area directly in front of the bricks gets hot enough to burn things.

Any flammable items that come too close to the bricks could catch on fire. If a cat or dog wanders past and flicks its tail against the bricks, it might get singed. If a toddler sticks its fingers in there, a trip to the hospital might ensue. Blue flame heaters are the newest technology and provide a different kind of heat than the catalytic and ceramic heaters.

Rather than radiating heat, blue flame heaters operate via convection the principal that heat rises , drawing cool air in through vents at the bottom of the heater and emitting warm air out the vents in the top. This is a heating method that is much like central heating in a house. Once the air temperature has risen sufficiently, the objects warm up as well. If you keep your RV at a warm temperature all the time especially at night , the objects in the room will never get cold.

Blue flame heaters draw cool air in from floor level through a row of vents at the bottom, heat it up, and emit the warm air out of vents at the top, relying on convection the fact that heat rises to move this air instead of using a blower. You can warm your hands and body by standing in front of one, but it is more of a warming sensation than a baking one. So, there is no risk of items immediately in front of the heater catching fire.

Blue flame heaters are a good idea for people with pets or children. The most popular brand is Mr. These manufacturers produce both blue flame and brick heaters in the same chassis, so other than the appearance of the bricks or the flame, the unit itself has the same look whether it is the brick or blue flame version.

The typical BTU range on these heaters is 5,, 10,, 20, and 30, They can also be purchased with or without a thermostat. There are some wonderful blue flame heaters that are designed to look like fireplaces, complete with logs, trim and beautiful wooden mantels. Manufacturers include Pleasant Hearth and ProCom. You can sit and watch the yellow flames dancing around the logs and warm your bones at the same time.

Connect the hose to the propane tank, using the adapters that came with the heater. Some heaters won't include the adapters. If this is the case, write down the. DeWALT Heaters. Unable to call now? Let us call you! If you would HERO Heater - The Real Hero in my Shop. The highlight is the cordless feature. By: Cask.

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Technical Details

A safe heat source for the garage, basement and more! This Mr. Heater 30, BTU Vent-free Heater can be permanently mounted to a wall or bolted to the floor with the included mounting brackets and fasteners. Its blue flame tube burner naturally circulates heat around any room up to square feet using the flames' natural convection…no fans or supplemental airflow needed! And like all Mr. Heater products, a factory-standard oxygen-depletion sensor and high-limit shutoff ensure safe operation indoors or out.

RV Heater – How to Install a Vent-Free Propane Heater in Your RV

Installing a vent-free propane heater is one of the best upgrades you can do for your RV if you plan to be spending a lot of time in chilly places. This page reviews how ventless propane heaters operate in comparison to traditional RV furnaces, it discusses the different technologies used in the design of various types of vent-free gas heaters on the market today — including catalytic heaters, ceramic brick and plaque heaters, and blue flame heaters — and it presents a step-by-step guide for installing a vent-free propane heater in your RV or camper. This post was first written in January, , but was completely overhauled and rewritten in October, Happiness is… a vent-free propane heater! We froze in our trailer during our first winter in Arizona. All modern motorhomes and campers ours included come equipped with a propane furnace. However, these loud, inefficient beasts use a lot of electricity, and can drain the batteries in one night. These are wonderful little appliances that use far less propane than a furnace and no electricity at all.

Author Message cbright Member Posted: Probably end up using in my workshop, not the cabin.

A propane wall heater is a great way to add low cost heating to any room. When installed correctly they are safe to use, and can be more economical than electric heaters. In the event of a power outage some models can be used without using an electric ignition, meaning you won't be without heat.

Small Cabin

Homeowners may find themselves in need of a propane heater at some point, especially if a portion of the home is being remodeled, leaving a wide opening for the weather elements to infiltrate the interior. Propane heaters consist of a propane tank with an attached valve and heat reflector assembly. Heat generated from the propane reflects into the immediate area to keep it warm. These heaters must be used in well-ventilated areas for overall safety. Because they use a highly flammable fuel, propane heaters must be checked prior to use. To ensure safety, you should mix some soap with water to make a solution. Any fittings or connections should have this solution applied to them before lighting the heater. If the solution seems to bubble up on certain fittings, you should not turn the heater on; this bubbling action indicates a propane leak that must be repaired before using the appliance. Activating the heater with leaking propane can easily cause an explosion. The propane tank must have its regulator set to the medium setting so that there is a sufficient amount of fuel entering the reflector area for ignition.

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MR HEATER 30,000 BTU BLUE FLAME VENT FREE HEATER
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